I earned this muffin: narrative bias and performance

A great post on how cognitive bias can affect training performance:

After more and more questioning, we started to uncover that her day was filled with little treats like this that she had “earned.” Because these were always in the context of some reward, they didn’t seem off-track, or not fitting within her diet. However, what she wasn’t aware of was the treats often happened much more often than she cared to realize.

This is narrative bias in action. You and I fall victim to the exact same thing.

http://www.strengtheory.com/5-ways-we-sabotage-success-with-cognitive-biases/

Pause, Clarify, Decide – ProfHacker – Blogs – The Chronicle of Higher Education

The book as a whole provides a valuable set of core principles for improving personal productivity, which feed into the process they call Pause-Clarify-Decide — training yourself to pause and think about what you’re doing, rather than just mindlessly reacting. Stopping to ask yourself periodically “what is the value of what I am doing right now?” can break you out of simply responding to crises or the trance of social media and help you redirect your attention to the most important tasks.

via Pause, Clarify, Decide – ProfHacker – Blogs – The Chronicle of Higher Education.

When is evidence sufficient for decision-making? A framework for understanding the pace of evidence adoption, Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research, Future Medicine

 

Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research

Vol. 2, No. 4, Pages 383-391 , DOI 10.2217/cer.13.39

(doi:10.2217/cer.13.39)

Special Report

When is evidence sufficient for decision-making? A framework for understanding the pace of evidence adoption

Robert W Dubois*1, Michael Lauer2 & Eleanor Perfetto3

Translation of medical evidence into practice has not kept pace with the growth of medical technology and knowledge. We present three case studies – statins, drug eluting stents and bone marrow transplantation for breast cancer – to propose a framework for describing five factors that may influence the rate of adoption. The factors are: validity, reliability and maturity of the science available before widespread adoption; communication of the science; economic drivers; patients’ and physicians’ ability to apply published scientific findings to their specific clinical needs; and incorporation into practice guidelines.

via When is evidence sufficient for decision-making? A framework for understanding the pace of evidence adoption, Journal of Comparative Effectiveness Research, Future Medicine.